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Research

 

Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, 2009

Study Highlights

  • Sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes off the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent – at 55 mph – of driving the length of an entire football field.
  • A texting driver is 23 times more likely to get into a crash than a non-texting driver.

 

University of Utah, 2006

Study Highlights

  • Using a cell phone while driving can delay a driver’s reaction time as much as having a blood alcohol concentration at the legal limit of .08 percent.

 

Pew Research, 2009

Study Highlights

  • One in three (34%) texting teens ages 16-17 say they have texted while driving.
  • More than half (52%) of cell-owning teens ages 16-17 say they have talked on a cell phone while driving.
  • 48% of all teens ages 12-17 say they have been in a car when the driver was texting.
  • 40% say they have been in a car when the driver used a cell phone in a way that put themselves or others in danger.

 

Harris Research Poll, 2011

Study Highlights

  • Three out of five (60%) drivers with cell phones use them while driving even though almost all adults (91%) know it is unsafe to do so.
  • More than one in five (22%) drivers with cell phones send or read text messages while driving.
  • More than half (57%) of drivers rate themselves as better than average drivers. Only 1% rate themselves as worse than average. Men (66%) are much more likely than women (48%) to think they are better than average.

 

NHTSA 2011 Distracted Driving Facts

Study Highlights

  • In 2011, about 10% of fatal crashes and 17% of injury crashes involved a distracted driver. This amounts to 3,331 people killed and an additional 387,000 injured in crashes involving a distracted driver.